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Tell Them!

8 Aug2017 DHBarticle SinglePg// Denise Hagin Burns

THE YOUTH of today will never know a world without technology. Known as the "iGeneration," they can connect to the world through a device in their hands. They live in a world of dangerous extremes. To them everything is fluid with no absolutes. Suicide is skyrocketing. Lockdown drills in schools are common occurrences. Pornography is literally in

their hands, a screen swipe away. They live under a barrage of social media. Their world is very, very loud.

Not long ago, a spirit of intercessory prayer overwhelmed me. The Lord said, "You need to advocate to the church on behalf of this generation to step up and take their place." The church has a place in their lives.

God reminded me of Paul encouraging a young man. "But you, Timothy, certainly know what I teach, and how I live, and what my purpose in life is. You know my faith, my patience, my love, and my endurance" (2 Tim. 3:10 NLT). Then in verse 14, "You must remain faithful to the things you have been taught. You know they are true, for you know you can trust those who taught you."

Can youth today say that of us? Do they know what we teach, how we live, our purpose in life? We must boldly speak up. We have to be the ones they can trust.

Psalm 78:2–4 (NLT) says, "I will teach you . . . stories our ancestors handed down to us. We will not hide these truths from our children; we will tell the next generation about the glorious deeds of the Lord, about his power and his mighty wonders."

Every generation has witnessed moves of God. It's the responsibility of all of us to tell these stories to this generation.

Recently my oldest son was on his computer, and I heard what sounded like my "pawpaw's" voice. One of his friends told him that his great grandpa, Kenneth E. Hagin, was on YouTube. He came to me and asked, "Mom, why didn't you tell me? He's laying hands on people and they're laughing and dancing. What is that?"

I didn't do this on purpose, but I was "hiding" these things from my son! I took it for granted that he knew. So we sat and watched videos of "pawpaw." I told him about miracles, healings, and the mighty move of God I had experienced when I was younger.

It really broke my heart. It's our responsibility to teach this generation—to pray and intercede for them. They might miss the move of the Holy Spirit if we don't tell them.

We all have a part to play. Twentysomethings, 30-somethings, we need you! We're counting on you because you have the ear of this generation. You know what they're going through. You can reach them.

Fortysomethings, 50-somethings, we need you! Mentor these 20- and 30-somethings. Be there for them. Spend time with them. Help them grow spiritually. Mentor them so they can help the iGeneration.

Sixty-plus—we need you! You're the prayer people! You know how to get in touch with God. We all should pray, but there's something about older saints who know how to get down on their knees and pray!

It's going to take all of us! Let this challenge penetrate your heart. Get involved. Pray. Do whatever you can to reach this generation.

Faith in Action

Pray This . . .
Heavenly Father, show me how I can make a difference and how I can work with every generation. I put away busyness and selfishness and commit my time and prayers to see a mighty move of the Holy Spirit in this generation. In Jesus' Name, amen.