Welcome!

 
Toggle
  • OctNovWOF2017 Cover WEB
    October/November 2017
  • SeptWOF2017 Cover
    September 2017
  • AugWOF2017 Cover
    August 2017
  • JuneJulyWOF2017 Cover
    June/July 2017
  • May2017WOF WEBcover
    May 2017
  • April2017WOF WEBcover
    April 2017
  • FebMar2017WOF_WEBcover
    February/March 2017
  • Jan2017 WOF CVR2
    January 2017
  • DecWOF2016 WEBcover
    December 2016
  • OctNovWOF WEBcover2016
    October/November 2016
  • Sept2016WOF CoverWEB
    September 2016
Print

Love + Prosperity

keh

// Kenneth E. Hagin

The Epistles are written specifically to the Church—to born-again believers. They are of great help to us as we try to live our daily lives according to the teachings of the Lord. These letters provide specific teaching that we need to understand. They give us guidance, direction, and correction we can use in our own situations. As we read the Epistles, we can get the feeling that the author, moved by the Holy Spirit, looked down through the centuries and saw our struggles and said, "Go this direction. Follow this example."

Here are several principles found in the Epistles that show us how our love walk is connected to our giving and that it is God's will that we prosper.

Love must motivate the believer's giving.

1 CORINTHIANS 13:3
3 And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me nothing.

The New Berkeley Version says, "And though I give all my belongings to feed the hungry and surrender my body to be burned, but I have no love, I am not in the least benefited."

Paul and John encouraged Christian charity among the brethren.

GALATIANS 6:10
10 As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.
1 JOHN 3:17–18
17 But whoso hath this world's good, and seeth his brother have need, and shutteth up his bowels of compassion from him, how dwelleth the love of God in him?
18 My little children, let us not love in word, neither in tongue; but in deed and in truth.

Believers are not to love or trust in money.
1 TIMOTHY 6:6–10, 17–18
6 But godliness with contentment is great gain.
7 For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out.
8 And having food and raiment let us be therewith content.
9 But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition.
10 For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. . . .
17 Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy;
18 That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate.

God wants His children to prosper.
3 John 2
2 Beloved, I wish above all things that thou mayest prosper and be in health, even as thy soul prospereth.

Some have argued that the phrase "that thou mayest prosper" does not refer to financial prosperity. However,
the Greek word translated "prosper" and "prospereth" is euodoo, which means "a good road" or "a good journey." At the very least, this phrase means to have a good and prosperous journey.

No one can have a good and prosperous journey if he is broke and in want every step of the way. Wouldn't the wish for someone to have a prosperous journey include his having enough resources to travel safely and comfortably?

Besides, the word translated "prosper" here is the same Greek word Paul used in First Corinthians 16:2 where he instructed believers to set aside money each week "as God hath prospered him." So the word prosper can certainly and without doubt be used—and is used—in reference to financial prosperity.

I believe this verse clearly means that God wants His children to prosper materially, physically, and spiritually.

[Editor's Note: This article was
adapted from Kenneth E. Hagin's
book The Midas Touch.]

 

 

Romans 4:20 (NIV) says that Abraham “did not waver through unbelief regarding the promise of God.” Many years ago my father, Kenneth E. Hagin, wrote in the flyleaf of his Bible, “God said it; I believe it; and that settles it.” Abraham had this same attitude, and we need to grab hold of it too. No matter how bad our situation looks, our victory is found in God’s promises and in never letting go of what our Heavenly Father has said.
Don’t Be Double-Minded
Often today believers affirm their faith publicly, but when they are by themselves, they begin to question God. They wonder if He can really help them. The moment they start doubting, they begin wavering in their faith.
The Bible is very clear about the danger of wavering.
James 1:6–7 (NIV)
6 When you ask, you must believe and not doubt, because the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind.
7 That person should not expect to receive anything from the Lord.
Faith does not look at circumstances, and it doesn’t regard feelings. It stays completely focused on God’s Word. Unfortunately, some people allow their situations and feelings to “speak” louder than Scripture.
Some people lose their healing because they stop looking at the Word and focus on what’s going on in their body. It’s dangerous to do this, because before long they will start talking wrong. They’ll begin to say things like, “I thought I was healed. I guess I lost my healing.”
When we start talking like that, we throw out our healing and open the door for the devil and all of his junk to come back in. If we would just stand strong on the Word, every symptom would leave.
Look to the Word
Anytime the enemy bombards your mind with his lies, you must counter those lies with the Word of God. When lack rears its ugly head, read what God said about prosperity. When sickness impacts your body, meditate on healing scriptures. When fear invades your life, find peace scriptures to read. When impossibilities stare you in the face, the Word holds your answer.
Reading God’s promises keeps us focused on them instead of on the distractions that are sent to prevent us from receiving what God has for us. When facing the impossible, we can’t afford to look at whatever is coming against us.
Start Talking